Lawrence Goldberg

Title: Senior Engineering Advisor
Company: National Science Foundation
Location: Alexandria, Virginia, United States

Lawrence Goldberg, Senior Engineering Advisor for the National Science Foundation, has been recognized by Marquis Who’s Who Top Engineers for dedication, achievements, and leadership in photonics, optics and electrical engineering.

Since 1998, Dr. Goldberg has served in his current role, bringing more than five decades of experience to the position. He previously served as a division and program director with the National Science Foundation. From 1967 to 1985, he utilized his skills as a laser research scientist with the Naval Research Laboratory. Earlier in his career, he conducted postdoctoral research with the University of Frankfurt, served as a science officer for the Office of Naval Research, conducted sabbatical research with Imperial College, was the interim head of the National Science Foundation’s Tokyo office in 1989 and was a US Embassy science fellow in Moldova. In the 1990s and early 2000s, Dr. Goldberg helped to develop and coordinate the NSF multidisciplinary initiative in Optical Science and Engineering, the NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering, the NSF Scholar-in-Residence at NIH activity (a model program now focused on the FDA), and the NSF/DARPA Photonics Technology Access Program (PTAP).

Set on his path at an early age, Dr. Goldberg first earned a Bachelor of Science from Washington University in 1961 and a PhD from Cornell University in 1966. In his career, he has received the Special Recognition Award from the National Photonics Initiative for his distinguished contributions in advancing optics and photonics. Dr. Goldberg holds several patents in the field and is a fellow of the Optical Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He has participated in government-level science studies in Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Romania. He was appointed by the president’s science advisor as NSF member of Joint Management Committee for US-Japan Joint Optoelectronics Project from 1996-2001. As a major NSF activity, Dr. Goldberg has provided oversight and secured NSF-wide support for national university-based user facilities in nanotechnology. In 1994, the National Nanofabrication Users Network (NNUN) was established for ten years. This was followed in 2004 by the expanded National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN).

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Lifetime Achievement 

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