Walter Hornberger

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Title: Director of Quality Assurance (Retired)
Company: Weil-McLain Division, United Dominion Industries
Location: Niles, Michigan, United States

Walter H. Hornberger Jr., Retired Director of Quality Assurance at the Weil-McLain Division of United Dominion Industries, has been recognized by Marquis Who’s Who Top Engineers for dedication, achievements and leadership in metallurgical engineering.

Now retired, Mr. Hornberger most recently served as the director of quality assurance at the Weil-McLain Division of United Dominion Industries from 1993 to 2001. Having worked in a number of engineering and management positions throughout his career, he was also the chairman of the Notre Dame chapter of the American Society for Metals International from 1978 to 1979, president of the board of directors for the NS Credit Union from 1980 to 1989 and president of the Blossom chapter of the MSPE. Prior to the start of his career, Mr. Hornberger graduated from Bowen High School in South Chicago and pursued a formal education at Urbana University, completing coursework in 1959. Completing additional coursework at the University of Illinois Navy Pier, he attended the Illinois Institute of Technology, where he attained a Bachelor of Science in metallurgical engineering in 1964. He also became a registered professional engineer in Michigan in 1974.

Having implemented the ISO 9000 at Weil-McLain, Mr. Hornberger has been noted for his achievements with the Engineer of the Year Award in 1985 and the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award. Outside of his primary trade, he maintains involvement with numerous organizations related to his field such as the National Society of Professional Engineers, among others. However, the highlight of Mr. Hornberger’s career was the time he spent working at Rockwell International, as the heat treatment manager. He came in at a time where the company was expanding and his predecessor was charged with increasing the capacity of the heat treating operation by 50%. He walked into a bad situation, but was given free rein to do what he needed to fix the furnace and make it more efficient. He felt that he learned the most and performed the most activities that touched on his metallurgic interests.

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